The Furnace

One Writer. One Story. Read to completion (with vigor).

Month: May, 2013

Listen to Kathlene Postma’s story Fetch at the Furnace

by CM

In case you missed it or just want to hear it again, check out Kathlene Postma’s story on soundcloud. Go ahead an subscribe to the page while you are at it. We’ll be updating with other recordings soon. 

See you at the next Furnace on August 1!

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The Bushwick Book Club Presents Original Music Inspired by The Furnace – Video

by Anca Szilagyi

Back in March, we teamed up with The Bushwick Book Club Seattle for the APRIL festival. Three musicians wrote and performed three absolutely lovely songs inspired by the three pieces we’ve presented so far. Check out the videos here, and stay tuned for the recording of Kathlene Postma’s performance, which is still giving us chills.

On Navigating Words and Life

by Anca Szilagyi

Fetch: noun:  The distance traveled by wind or waves across open water; the distance a vessel must sail to reach open water.

Kathlene Postma’s performance of “Fetch” is this Thursday at 7 pm, at the Hollow Earth Radio performance space. The story’s title comes from a nautical term (definition above) and is one of several terms that organize the story. I asked Kathlene about it in anticipation of her reading.

AS: How did you come to use nautical terminology as headings for the sections of “Fetch”? Did the terms come before the story? Did the story call for the terms?

Kathlene Postma: Great question! The nautical terminology and the story “Fetch” grew up together.  My husband and I are both teachers, and we have three school-age daughters.  Every day at least one or more persons in my house are memorizing terms or figuring out how to explain them.  In this story Georgia, the central character tries to understand something as mammoth as Lake Superior while also struggling with the results of a terrible car accident.The funny thing about words and their definitions is the way in which a person comes to comprehend them.  Our lives are layered with seemingly random but powerful impressions and events–a car accident, a new town, a shattered foot–and those can saturate abstract words or principles we might be memorizing in school.  If you teach, you spend most of your time organizing knowledge for a group of students, but what happens creatively within that organization is unique to each student.  You can’t control what an individual does with the information you provide or the way it integrates into who she or he is becoming. There is a magic in how that works.  With this story I try to explore the illogical beauty of the process.  For Georgia, the nautical terms are peripheral–she merely learns them to help another teacher–but they help organize for the reader the direction her life takes.

From “Fetch” by Kathlene Postma

by Anca Szilagyi

Here’s a tiny taste of Kathlene’s gorgeous story “Fetch,” which she’ll read at Hollow Earth Radio in just one week!

It seemed as if she had been the one to die, so light she felt, so porous and open to the snowy sky. When the surgeon explained she was fortunate to still have her leg, she fixated on a hawk that hung every day over a nearby cornfield. It seemed frozen in the air.